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The International Reach of Organized Crime

Earlier this year, LatAmThought wrote a commentary about the international reach or criminal organizations in the Americas. Last week, we published an article on the International Relations and…

Tradtional Advertising, Non-tradtional Brands: Colombia’s Ministry of Defense and The Government of Panamanian President Ricardo Martinelli

Colombian Government Spends Money to Talk to FARC Rebels Advertising Age, a leading trade in the advertising industry, published a story on its front page during the week…

Paraguay’s Anti-Terrorist Group and the US

On 4 November 2009, the United States announced they would donate US$1.39 million in equipment towards the formation of an elite unit of highly trained troops in the…

Violence in Rio de Janeiro and Brazil’s Image Gap

Though we were a bit slow on the uptake, LatAmThought recently published an article on World Politics Review analyzing the impact of the internationally-newsworthy violence in Rio de Janeiro…

An Early End to Classes in Honduras

Public education is the latest service to suffer as a result of the political conflict in Honduras. On 16 October 2009, in spite of protests and appeals from…

Colombia’s Internally Displaced: Out of Tercer Milenio Park, Problems Remain

A few weeks ago, I wrote a commentary for the Americas Quartetly Blog about a recent settlement between the Colombian government and leaders of a group of Internally…

The Dangers of Prison Transfers

The (dare I say, even sarcastically) classic 1997 movie Con Air is based on the premise of a prison transfer gone awry. In the movie, a group of…

Brazilian Oil PR Bonanza

Though there are a variety big issues in Brazil right now, mostly involving the Sarney corruption scandal and the Senate’s Internet censorship during the upcoming elections, there is…

“Tres Perguntas a…LatAmThought”

The Portuguese Daily Economico recently asked on our open forum to answer a few questions regarding the comments made by Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez during the week of…

Election Watch in Brazil: Female Candidates at the Fore

The presidential elections are a little over a year away in Brazil, and the campaigns are beginning to heat up. This week, Epoca Magazine announced that the former…

A Shortage of Meat in Argentina?

The Economist magazine published an interesting article this week about the rise of vegetarianism in a nation known internationally for its love of meat. According to the article,…

Honduras is unique, but not alone

More than a month on, the 28 June coup in which Honduran President Manuel Zelaya was forcibly removed by the Honduran military has morphed into an internal power struggle…

Affirmative Action in Colombia and Brazil: Shared Lessons

Brazil and Colombia have a lot in common and a lot to learn from one another; though they don’t share the same language or colonizers, they do share…

Deforestation’s Impact Goes Beyond Destruction of The Environment

Last night I attended an interesting panel discussion about the destruction of the Amazon at the Americas Society/Council of the Americas in Manhattan featuring Bruce Babbitt, a retired…

Twitter in Brazil

While Twitter has revolutionized communication in the US and around the world, it has had an especially large impact on Brazil. Embraced by pop stars and politicians alike,…

Honduras should open our eyes to discontent with democracy in the region

Within 48 hours of the coup in Honduras, much has been written about what this means for Latin America, with the best analysis acknowledging that the coup breaks…

A Silver Lining in the Cloud

Mounting political tensions in Honduras finally spilled over on 28 June 2009, the day the nation was set to vote on the “cuarta urna“, a proposal from back…

LASA: Reflections on Blogging on Latin America

I very much enjoyed Eliot’s last blog entry on news sources and how they’re suffering from, or at least needing to adapt to, the massive flow of news…

“If it exists in the microwave, we’ll cook it”

Readers be warned: This is another post that talks about the newspaper industry. Most (if not all) bloggers are inherently news junkies, so this should hardly come as a surprise. Yet…

LASA: Some thoughts on security in Brazil and Central America

The Latin America Studies Association (LASA) bi-annual conference is taking place in Rio de Janeiro this year. With over 5,000 participants, it is supposed to be one of…